>Iowa & Mitsuhiro Oikawa

>Today is the Iowa Caucus, an event that quite honestly has too much weight given to it–solely because it’s the first electoral event of the US primary season. Therefore, Iowans (who aren’t really that representative of the whole nation, although in a nation of 300 million plus spread out over a continent, no state is, and is proof positive of the need for the interregional primary system) get to essentially do the first vetting of candidates, and the rest of us (especially those of us who won’t be able to vote until after the absurd Super Tuesday) have to do our pickings based on the opinions of Iowa & New Hampshire.

Or to put it in an even more absurd perspective: residents of 2 barely urban states choose the candidates for a majority urbanised nation who will go to the polls in November to participate in an election which is not decided by the popular vote.

In all fairness, I like the quaint notion of the caucus, and for a state like Iowa, it makes sense to have that format. That said, it’s no bellwether.

So what does Mitsuhiro Oikawa have to do with this? Nothing really. Much like how Iowa & New Hampshire’s status during primary season is out of proportion with the rest of the nation, so is Oikawa’s status in relation to this post.

But he is a cute little aging pretty boy, isn’t he? (That’s him swaying on the left in the video.)

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4 comments

  1. Anonymous · January 3, 2008

    >i agree that iowa and new hampshire are not representative of the whole country. and even though no state can be completely representative, some states are *more* representative than others. so, iowa and new hampshire are at the bottom of the representativeness scale.i’m not sure if the interregional primary system is the best solution, but something needs to be changed.one legitimate concern (and an argument in favor of keeping iowa and new hampshire at the beginning of the process) is that, in large states such as california, texas, new york, florida, it is close to impossible for candidates to personally meet with lots of voters. so instead of intimate “town hall” meetings, candidates have to spend a lot of money on television ads in the big states in order to get their message out. of course, when candidates have to spend so much money on television ads, it tends to drive out good people who may not be the strongest fund raisers.

  2. Anonymous · January 3, 2008

    >i agree that iowa and new hampshire are not representative of the whole country. and even though no state can be completely representative, some states are *more* representative than others. so, iowa and new hampshire are at the bottom of the representativeness scale.i’m not sure if the interregional primary system is the best solution, but something needs to be changed.one legitimate concern (and an argument in favor of keeping iowa and new hampshire at the beginning of the process) is that, in large states such as california, texas, new york, florida, it is close to impossible for candidates to personally meet with lots of voters. so instead of intimate “town hall” meetings, candidates have to spend a lot of money on television ads in the big states in order to get their message out. of course, when candidates have to spend so much money on television ads, it tends to drive out good people who may not be the strongest fund raisers.

  3. ponoono · January 5, 2008

    >its ridiculous that states with less than 1% of the national population are allowed such an impact on he general elections… worse still that like 60% of the people in those states have the same last name !!!pretty boy? looks more like the 1972 eye makeup stylist has run amok again….

  4. ponoono · January 5, 2008

    >its ridiculous that states with less than 1% of the national population are allowed such an impact on he general elections… worse still that like 60% of the people in those states have the same last name !!!pretty boy? looks more like the 1972 eye makeup stylist has run amok again….

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