>There’s Something Kind of Patronising Going On Here

>As Suzanne Sugarbaker said on Designing Women: “Anytime someone says they want to see the real something, they mean hanging out with a bunch of poor people.”

Apparently, that is the case in Rio

If it was held by the community, then I’d think it was good, but the idea of having drug-run and militia-protected parties in the middle of the slums where any supposed protest aspect of the music is lost by perpetuating the same cycle of exploitation. 
Granted there seem to be exceptions, but as with many things in life, it’s all about the money trail.
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6 comments

  1. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >i agree with ms. sugarbaker’s somewhat cynical observation.interestingly, in the u.s., the italian mafia was very involved in putting together parties — from prohibition times right on up to las vegas of the 70s. perhaps there’s a natural affinity between illegal activity and hedonistic parties?and as far as “private militias” being in charge of security for the parties (instead of the police), the reality is that (a) the brazilian police and military essentially abandoned the favelas long ago and (b) the brazilian police and military are too corrupt to be trusted (aside from taking bribes, they also hire themselves out to rich people as hit men and drive poor people out of upscale neighborhoods by threat and force).

  2. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >i agree with ms. sugarbaker’s somewhat cynical observation.interestingly, in the u.s., the italian mafia was very involved in putting together parties — from prohibition times right on up to las vegas of the 70s. perhaps there’s a natural affinity between illegal activity and hedonistic parties?and as far as “private militias” being in charge of security for the parties (instead of the police), the reality is that (a) the brazilian police and military essentially abandoned the favelas long ago and (b) the brazilian police and military are too corrupt to be trusted (aside from taking bribes, they also hire themselves out to rich people as hit men and drive poor people out of upscale neighborhoods by threat and force).

  3. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >i agree with ms. sugarbaker’s somewhat cynical observation.interestingly, in the u.s., the italian mafia was very involved in putting together parties — from prohibition times right on up to las vegas of the 70s. perhaps there’s a natural affinity between illegal activity and hedonistic parties?and as far as “private militias” being in charge of security for the parties (instead of the police), the reality is that (a) the brazilian police and military essentially abandoned the favelas long ago and (b) the brazilian police and military are too corrupt to be trusted (aside from taking bribes, they also hire themselves out to rich people as hit men and drive poor people out of upscale neighborhoods by threat and force).

  4. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >i agree with ms. sugarbaker’s somewhat cynical observation.interestingly, in the u.s., the italian mafia was very involved in putting together parties — from prohibition times right on up to las vegas of the 70s. perhaps there’s a natural affinity between illegal activity and hedonistic parties?and as far as “private militias” being in charge of security for the parties (instead of the police), the reality is that (a) the brazilian police and military essentially abandoned the favelas long ago and (b) the brazilian police and military are too corrupt to be trusted (aside from taking bribes, they also hire themselves out to rich people as hit men and drive poor people out of upscale neighborhoods by threat and force).

  5. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >argh! the dreaded double posting!

  6. Anonymous · May 29, 2008

    >argh! the dreaded double posting!

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